Budweiser redesigns can to resemble bowtie
“The Budweiser bowtie can is a natural progression from the new packaging introduced in 2011 that emphasized the iconic bowtie, a symbol that first appeared in a national advertising campaign for Budweiser in 1956.” —prnewswire
The new beer cans will appear on shelves starting May 6th, 2013.

Budweiser redesigns can to resemble bowtie

“The Budweiser bowtie can is a natural progression from the new packaging introduced in 2011 that emphasized the iconic bowtie, a symbol that first appeared in a national advertising campaign for Budweiser in 1956.” —prnewswire

The new beer cans will appear on shelves starting May 6th, 2013.

Pentagram redesigns NYC parking signs

Pentagram redesigns NYC parking signs

Scrollbars from 1981 - present
From Xerox Star’s arrows, diamonds, lines and boxes to Apple’s curved, semi-opaque rectangle, the design of the scrollbar has been reshaped and permutated in countless ways. Agencies eventually decided that it was necessary to make a new one for each client/project for a while even. (Does this still happen?)

Scrollbars from 1981 - present

From Xerox Star’s arrows, diamonds, lines and boxes to Apple’s curved, semi-opaque rectangle, the design of the scrollbar has been reshaped and permutated in countless ways. Agencies eventually decided that it was necessary to make a new one for each client/project for a while even. (Does this still happen?)

Coca-Cola and Pepsi continue to rely on nostalgia for throwback can designs. Did these iconic brands need so many redesigns through the last decade to stay fresh?
“People seriously love their cola cans. Yet Coca-Cola and Pepsi are always tinkering with their packaging…” —Gabriel Beltrone, via AdWeek

Coca-Cola and Pepsi continue to rely on nostalgia for throwback can designs. Did these iconic brands need so many redesigns through the last decade to stay fresh?

“People seriously love their cola cans. Yet Coca-Cola and Pepsi are always tinkering with their packaging…” —Gabriel Beltrone, via AdWeek

Google Gmail gets a redesign with some new features including “information density” adjustment (a.k.a. whitespace or table padding), smarter search, more fluid page width, and a cleaner grid (oh, and lots of gray).

via gizmodo

A redesign for Amazon.com appears to be rolling out to select Google Chrome users (with Amazon Prime accounts).

This is the first major redesign for Amazon.com in a while, and it includes the same style left navigation drop down menu with some major changes. More specifically, there is a definite push for Amazon Prime, including books, e-books, cloud storage, music, streaming and download videos. Search gets a face lift, and the bright orange and blue boxes have been reduced to accent colors, something that many users will probably appreciate.

The timing of the site redesign seems fitting for the new Kindle product launch (shipping mid-November). Interestingly enough, we did not spot any redesigned pages on any browsers other than Chrome. It makes sense when you think about integration into Google Chrome’s web browser apps combined with the Kindle Fire running its own brew of Android.

If the rest of the redesign resembles the updated site navigation, we may be in for a big surprise.