Posts tagged brands

Budweiser redesigns can to resemble bowtie
“The Budweiser bowtie can is a natural progression from the new packaging introduced in 2011 that emphasized the iconic bowtie, a symbol that first appeared in a national advertising campaign for Budweiser in 1956.” —prnewswire
The new beer cans will appear on shelves starting May 6th, 2013.

Budweiser redesigns can to resemble bowtie

“The Budweiser bowtie can is a natural progression from the new packaging introduced in 2011 that emphasized the iconic bowtie, a symbol that first appeared in a national advertising campaign for Budweiser in 1956.” —prnewswire

The new beer cans will appear on shelves starting May 6th, 2013.

Coca-Cola and Pepsi continue to rely on nostalgia for throwback can designs. Did these iconic brands need so many redesigns through the last decade to stay fresh?
“People seriously love their cola cans. Yet Coca-Cola and Pepsi are always tinkering with their packaging…” —Gabriel Beltrone, via AdWeek

Coca-Cola and Pepsi continue to rely on nostalgia for throwback can designs. Did these iconic brands need so many redesigns through the last decade to stay fresh?

“People seriously love their cola cans. Yet Coca-Cola and Pepsi are always tinkering with their packaging…” —Gabriel Beltrone, via AdWeek

Myspace.com redesign
Enough about the logo, new pictures are unveiled for the Myspace.com site redesign which is beginning to rollout.

“…There are big cosmetic changes too. Long criticized for cluttered, clunky home pages, MySpace is streamlining its design. It will show fewer ads, but place them more prominently. It also will have far fewer buttons and page templates. In a presentation, the company called it “cleaning up MySpace e-waste…””—excerpted from Huffington Post article

Above is a Glee Topic Page featured on the relaunched Myspace.com.

Myspace.com redesign

Enough about the logo, new pictures are unveiled for the Myspace.com site redesign which is beginning to rollout.

“…There are big cosmetic changes too. Long criticized for cluttered, clunky home pages, MySpace is streamlining its design. It will show fewer ads, but place them more prominently. It also will have far fewer buttons and page templates. In a presentation, the company called it “cleaning up MySpace e-waste…””
—excerpted from Huffington Post article

Above is a Glee Topic Page featured on the relaunched Myspace.com.

Myspace logo redesign
At the Warm Gun Design conference,  VP of User Experience, Mike Macadaan, presents the foundation of Myspace’s new branding approach.

“MySpace is a platform for people to be whatever they want, so we’ve decided to give them the space to do it.” —Mike Macadaan

What do you think? Our first thought is that the new logo framework has some potential to be visually fun.
Forbes takes note that Bobby Solomon (@KitsuneNoir) identified the font used in the new logo as a modified version of Akzidenz-Grotesk medium, not Helvetica as others assumed.  How often does one see Forbes commenting on type selection? We all have logo redesign fever this week…
Below is a video from the presentation:




(more via "MySpace Unveils New, Artsy Logo" on TechCrunch)
update 10/10/10: In response to @KitsuneNoir and TechCrunch’s attempts at identifying the font, Erik Spiekermann writes via twitter: “AG has a curly y, as does Helvetica. It looks like Calibri.”

Myspace logo redesign

At the Warm Gun Design conference, VP of User Experience, Mike Macadaan, presents the foundation of Myspace’s new branding approach.

MySpace is a platform for people to be whatever they want, so we’ve decided to give them the space to do it.” —Mike Macadaan

What do you think? Our first thought is that the new logo framework has some potential to be visually fun.

Forbes takes note that Bobby Solomon (@KitsuneNoir) identified the font used in the new logo as a modified version of Akzidenz-Grotesk medium, not Helvetica as others assumed.  How often does one see Forbes commenting on type selection? We all have logo redesign fever this week…

Below is a video from the presentation:

(more via "MySpace Unveils New, Artsy Logo" on TechCrunch)

update 10/10/10: In response to @KitsuneNoir and TechCrunch’s attempts at identifying the font, Erik Spiekermann writes via twitter: “AG has a curly y, as does Helvetica. It looks like Calibri.”

The Gap logo redesign
Gap Clothing stores has unveiled a new logo mark on their website this week. The new logo in sans serif Helvetica treatment is so removed from the iconic brand aesthetic of the past years. We were surprised to see such a drastic makeover. Perhaps the new design is trying to be a little reminiscent of the store’s logo from 1969? It would’ve been cool if the Gap brought back their retro roots and fully revived the old logo. Below is signage from the first Gap store which opened in the year 1969 in San Francisco.

Does anyone know the design firm behind the brand new logo? A quick Google search wasn’t too helpful this time around. If you have any additional knowledge behind the new approach or the brand’s design history we appreciate your notes.
update 10/6: We received a couple tips that Laird + Partners is the creative agency behind the Gap logo redesign, but this was not 100% clear based on the info on their company website.
update 10/7: The site IDSGN reports that as follow-up to the Gap logo redesign online saga, the Gap has released a statement on their Facebook indicating their plans to crowdsource a new logo.

"Thanks for everyone’s input on the new logo! We’ve had the same logo for 20+ years, and this is just one of the things we’re changing. We know this logo created a lot of buzz and we’re thrilled to see passionate debates unfolding! So much so we’re asking you to share your designs. We love our version, but we’d like to see other ideas. Stay tuned for details in the next few days on this crowd sourcing project." —via The Gap on Facebook

Is this the outcome all of the haters were looking for? What implications does this scenario, along with the Tropicana fiasco last year, have for graphic design professionals?

The Gap logo redesign

Gap Clothing stores has unveiled a new logo mark on their website this week. The new logo in sans serif Helvetica treatment is so removed from the iconic brand aesthetic of the past years. We were surprised to see such a drastic makeover. Perhaps the new design is trying to be a little reminiscent of the store’s logo from 1969? It would’ve been cool if the Gap brought back their retro roots and fully revived the old logo. Below is signage from the first Gap store which opened in the year 1969 in San Francisco.

Does anyone know the design firm behind the brand new logo? A quick Google search wasn’t too helpful this time around. If you have any additional knowledge behind the new approach or the brand’s design history we appreciate your notes.

update 10/6: We received a couple tips that Laird + Partners is the creative agency behind the Gap logo redesign, but this was not 100% clear based on the info on their company website.

update 10/7: The site IDSGN reports that as follow-up to the Gap logo redesign online saga, the Gap has released a statement on their Facebook indicating their plans to crowdsource a new logo.

"Thanks for everyone’s input on the new logo! We’ve had the same logo for 20+ years, and this is just one of the things we’re changing. We know this logo created a lot of buzz and we’re thrilled to see passionate debates unfolding! So much so we’re asking you to share your designs. We love our version, but we’d like to see other ideas. Stay tuned for details in the next few days on this crowd sourcing project." —via The Gap on Facebook

Is this the outcome all of the haters were looking for? What implications does this scenario, along with the Tropicana fiasco last year, have for graphic design professionals?

JetBlue appropriates Milton Glaser’s iconic “I ♥ NY logo.”
This “signifies the first time that a corporation has received permission to link its brand to the symbol that is widely recognized as one of the most valuable assets in the realm of tourism marketing…” —NYTimes.com"…Created in 1975, the I LOVE NEW YORK logo is an icon recognized around the world.  While it has often been imitated, this is the first time the powerful logo has been adapted and co-branded for joint use with another entity, demonstrating the significant role JetBlue plays for travel and economic development throughout the State of New York.  Use of the logo is part of a long-term marketing partnership with the Empire State to jointly promote tourism and help spur business opportunities state-wide.  The co-branded trademark features a deliberate intersecting of the popular I LOVE NEW YORK phrase with the famous red heart and the JetBlue logo…” —prnewswire
To coincide with the new JetBlue marketing campaign, The New York Times is asking readers to submit their own reinterpretations of the design.

JetBlue appropriates Milton Glaser’s iconic “I ♥ NY logo.”

This “signifies the first time that a corporation has received permission to link its brand to the symbol that is widely recognized as one of the most valuable assets in the realm of tourism marketing…” —NYTimes.com

"…Created in 1975, the I LOVE NEW YORK logo is an icon recognized around the world.  While it has often been imitated, this is the first time the powerful logo has been adapted and co-branded for joint use with another entity, demonstrating the significant role JetBlue plays for travel and economic development throughout the State of New York.  Use of the logo is part of a long-term marketing partnership with the Empire State to jointly promote tourism and help spur business opportunities state-wide.  The co-branded trademark features a deliberate intersecting of the popular I LOVE NEW YORK phrase with the famous red heart and the JetBlue logo…” —prnewswire

To coincide with the new JetBlue marketing campaign, The New York Times is asking readers to submit their own reinterpretations of the design.